ZCBlog: Winds of Change


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Electricity production from wind power in the UK has increased dramatically over the last few years, as this graph shows.

Plotted using National Grid data, it shows the proportion of UK electricity that is produced by wind turbines, from early 2009 to March 2013. The daily values appear chaotic as wind power output fluctuates between windy and calm days. But the 90 day rolling average shows a clear upwards trend, and this is at least partially due to the completion of a few very large offshore wind farms: September 2012 saw the completion of the Greater Gabbard wind farm off the coast of Suffolk with a 504 MW maximum output. It was the world’s largest wind farm – but only until early April 2013, when the last one of 175  turbines at the London Array (Phase I) offshore wind farm in the Thames Estuary was connected, bringing that wind farm to the top of the global league table with 630 MW.

Research carried out by CAT’s Zero Carbon Britain research team (to be published later this year) shows that offshore wind power has the potential to be the ‘work horse’ of a renewably powered future energy scenario, producing nearly half of our energy. So these recent developments are certainly steps in the right direction!